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Un Sacre du Printemps, photo by Bart Grietens

Un Sacre du Printemps, photo by Bart Grietens

Un Sacre du Printemps (2015)

Choreography : Daniel Linehan
Musical Advice and Dramaturgy :
Alain Franco
Music :
Igor Stravinsky (version for two pianos)
Dance: 
Jeanne Colin, Andras Déri, Alexandra Dolgova, Erik Eriksson, Taha Ghauri, James McGinn, Charles Ngombengombe, Krisjanis Sants, Christoffer Schieche, Hagar Tenenbaum, Roman Van Houtven, Kathryn Vickers, Tiran Willemse
Music performance :
Jean-Luc Plouvier (ICTUS, piano) and Alain Franco (piano)
Lighting Design : Elke Verachtert
Styling : Frédérick Denis

(50 min)

In The Karaoke Dialogues, Linehan investigates the choreographic possibilities of karaoke, which he applies to the great classics of European literature. Imagine that Kafka goes to the karaoke bar and performs a dialogue of Plato, who is in the next room reading Cervantes from a screen. Karaoke meets dance meets philosophy.

The texts – which deal with laws, crimes, and other legal problems – are borrowed from many sources, but are blended together as if they tell the story of a single legal process. By using the dialogues as the basis for an intricate choreography, the seven dancers amplify the peculiarities of each text. The words determine the rhythm of the dance. Each dancer shifts back and forth between their individual approach to the text scores and the group dynamics of a collective choreography. The Karaoke Dialogues offers an unconventional perspective on how we can give voice and body to what we read.

Production: Hiatus (Brussels, BE) 
Co-production
: deSingel International Arts Campus (Antwerp, BE), Opéra de Lillle (FR), Festival de Marseille (FR) 

In collaboration with: P.A.R.T.S. (Brussels, BE)
With the support of the Flemish Government (BE)

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photo by Frédéric Iovino

The Karaoke Dialogues, photo by Frédéric Iovino

The Karaoke Dialogues (2014)

Concept and Choreography : Daniel Linehan
Dance and Creation :
Cédric Andrieux, Yumiko Funaya, Néstor García Díaz, Kennis Hawkins, Anneleen Keppens, Anne Pajunen, Víctor Pérez Armero
Dramaturgy :
Aaron Schuster
Lighting Design :
Jan Fedinger
Costume Design :
Frédérick Denis
Scenography : 
88888
Technical Coordination :
Elke Verachtert

(80 min)

In The Karaoke Dialogues, Linehan investigates the choreographic possibilities of karaoke, which he applies to the great classics of European literature. Imagine that Kafka goes to the karaoke bar and performs a dialogue of Plato, who is in the next room reading Cervantes from a screen. Karaoke meets dance meets philosophy.

The texts – which deal with laws, crimes, and other legal problems – are borrowed from many sources, but are blended together as if they tell the story of a single legal process. By using the dialogues as the basis for an intricate choreography, the seven dancers amplify the peculiarities of each text. The words determine the rhythm of the dance. Each dancer shifts back and forth between their individual approach to the text scores and the group dynamics of a collective choreography. The Karaoke Dialogues offers an unconventional perspective on how we can give voice and body to what we read.

Co-productionOpéra de Lille (FR), Kunstenfestivaldesarts (Brussels, BE), Rencontres chorégraphiques internationales de Seine-Saint-Denis (FR) Vooruit Arts Center (Ghent, BE),  PACT Zollverein (Essen, DE) 
Residencies: Kaaitheater (Brussels, BE), deSingel International Arts Campus (Antwerp, BE), Opéra de Lille (FR), PACT Zollverein (Essen, DE)
With the support of the Flemish authorities (BE)

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Gaze is a Gap is a Ghost, photo by Jean Luc Tanghe

Gaze is a Gap is a Ghost (2012)

Concept and Choreography : Daniel Linehan
Created and Performed by :
Salka Ardal Rosengren, Anneleen Keppens, Maria Ferreira Silva
Dramaturgy :
Aaron Schuster
Stage and Light Design :
Elke Verachtert
Costume Design :
Icaro Ibañez-Arricivita
Design Collaboration :
88888

(70 min)

Gaze is a Gap is a Ghost establishes a dialogue between the visible and the invisible, generating a confrontation between our external knowledge of the world and our internal imaginative life. A video recording taken from the perspective of the dancers gives us the impression that we are looking through their eyes. From the “inside” view, it appears that it is not so much the dancers who are moving, but rather the space itself which is spinning around and turning upside down. In this way Gaze is a Gap is a Ghost poses a series of questions about the relationship between humans and technology, between the real and the virtual. How does impersonal technology influence our ideas of intimacy? How do the digital media influence the way we experience our physical existence? In the end, the performance emphasizes the inevitable and irreconcilable divide separating the dancer from the choreography, separating the human from the structure.

Co-production: Kaaitheater (Brussels, BE), deSingel (Antwerp, BE), BUDA (Kortrijk, BE), Sadler’s Wells (London, UK), Opéra de Lille (Lille, FR), Centre de Développement Chorégraphique Toulouse/ Midi-Pyrenées (FR)
Residencies: PACT Zollverein/CZNRW (Essen, DE), deSingel (Antwerp, BE), STUK (Leuven, BE), BUDA (Kortrijk, BE), Kaaitheater (Brussels, BE), Vooruit (Gent, BE)
With the support of the Flemish authorities (BE), and Arcadi (FR)

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Zombie Aporia, photo by Jean Luc Tanghe

Zombie Aporia (2011)

Concept and Choreography : Daniel Linehan
Created and Performed by :
Daniel Linehan, Salka Ardal Rosengren, Thibault Lac
Lighting Design :
Brian Broeders
Vocal Coach :
Jonas Cole
Dramaturgy :
Bojana Cvejic and Noé Soulier

(50 min)

Zombie Aporia is a dance performance that is composed of many small pieces, like a rock music concert, or a book of poetry. The dancers use their voices in order to create an intricate connection between dance and music, so that the dance and the music are both being generated by the very same bodies. The performance breaks down the boundaries that separate body from voice, sound from image, rhythm from meaning. Zombie Aporia seeks to discover possibility within apparently impossible contradictions: music that is the result of dancing, emotional expression that begins physically, spontaneous feelings that are designed, words that give more of a sense of vibration than meaning.

Co-production: Rencontres chorégrapiques internationales de Seine-Saint Denis, Centre national de la danse (Pantin, FR); Centre de Développement Chorégraphique Toulouse / Midi-Pyrénées (FR), in the context of the European project ‘Departs’; Kunstencentrum Vooruit (Gent, BE); BUDA Kunstencentrum (Kortrijk, BE) Residencies: L’Agora, Cité International de la danse, Montpellier Danse (FR); Centre de Développement Chorégraphique Toulouse / Midi-Pyrénées (FR); O Rumo do Fumo & Forum Dança (Lisboa, PT); Kunstencentrum Vooruit (Gent, BE) With the support of the Flemish authorities, Arcadi – distribution

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Being Together without any Voice, photo by Bart Grietens

Being Together without any Voice (2010)

Concept and Choreography : Daniel Linehan
Created and Performed by :
Daniel Linehan, Anne Pajunen, Noé Soulier, Anna Whaley
Lighting Design :
Joris de Bolle

(28 min)

“…social or habitual, pattern or expression, image or rhythm, detached or within, unified or multiple, random or determined, labor or game, one or both…”

In Being Together without any Voice, the silent interactions of the performers do not resemble the standard grammatical formats of statements, questions, and commands.  If they were to speak, they would use “or-phrases,” phrases that express possibility without asserting anything definite. But the performers do not speak, and they use their voices only when they are alone. The absence of the voice is clearly not meant to bring about a “pure” state before language or beyond language. It is simply a restriction that is meant to reveal different possible ways of being together, ways that are sometimes unfamiliar and sometimes uncannily familiar. What happens when we consider the other person as an object, or the other as ourselves? What happens when we consider ourselves as an object? Or ourselves as an other?

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Montage for Three Photo by Vincent Jeannot

Montage for Three (2009)

Concept and Choreography : Daniel Linehan
Created and Performed by :
Daniel Linehan, Salka Ardal Rosengren
Lighting Design :
Ise Debrouwere

(25 min)

Montage for Three is a choreography-of-images for two dancers and one projector. It takes its source material entirely from found photographs, both famous and obscure. These images are projected alongside the two dancers, who embody the photographs with the absurd and impossible aim of giving presence to something which is absent. The living/moving/present bodies confront the mechanical/static/reproduced bodies in such a way that the two forms begin to merge and exchange roles. The dancers become a trigger for the viewer’s memory, as the still images begin to take on a life of their own.

Coproduction : P.A.R.T.S. Bruxelles, Rencontres Chorégraphiques Internationales de Seine-Saint-Denis

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Not About Everything, photo by Jason Somma

Not About Everything (2007)

Created and Performed by : Daniel Linehan
Original Lighting Design by :
Joe Levasseur
Dramaturgy by :
Juliette Mapp

(35 min)

A single body enters the space and begins to turn. The turning begins gently, but it gradually transforms into insane gyratory motion. Within the singularity of his obsessive circular motion, Daniel Linehan introduces a series of variations, accelerations, and subtle shifts, creating a funny and complex dance. He subjects himself to strenuous physical and mental processes involving multiple simultaneous tasks: to speak, think, react, address the audience, etc., without ceasing his perpetual spinning. Linehan tells us that he is not speaking about desperation, endurance, or government policy; he is not speaking about celebrities, virtuosity, or metaphysical problems. Yet even though his words seem to negate, he calls to our attention these issues that evoke a world far larger than his contained little circle. Endlessly spinning around in the center of a shifting network of ideas, Daniel Linehan creates an inverted black hole, a space of disorienting vertigo perhaps, but also a space of thoughtful reflection where all of these ideas can flow and resound.

Not About Everything premiered at Dance Theater Workshop in November 2007, and has since been presented internationally.

Not About Everything was created in part through the Bessie Schönberg/First Light Commissioning Program and Creative Residency Program of Dance Theater Workshop with support from the Jerome Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts (a US federal agency), the New York State Council of the Arts, and the Jerome Robbins Foundation. This work was also made possible in part through the Movement Research Artist Residency Project, funded in part by the Leonard and Sophie Davis Fund.

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2 Comments
  1. Steph permalink

    Hi,

    I saw your piece ‘Not About Everything’ at Sadler’s Wells earlier in the year and was wondering if you have the text of your letter online anywhere? I’d really like to read/hear it again….

    Very much enjoyed your pieces, they stayed with me….looking forward to seeing more of your work.

    Best,
    Steph

  2. Wow, may not be about everything, but it’s about plenty.
    Smart, viscerally gripping and–in it’s combination of determination, aspiration and confusion–human(e). A combination I don’t come across a lot.
    An experience I won’t forget.
    Ron

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